13 Minutes – Sarah Pinborough

13 minutes is a gripping YA thriller/mystery, set in a sixth form college in Lancashire.

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A popular girl from the school has been found drowning in a river in the early hours of the morning. Although she survives, she ends up being dead (unconscious and with no heartbeat) for 13 minutes before being resuscitated. When she wakes up, she has no memory of the events leading up to her accident, or how she ended up in the river. She and her friend Becca are determined to unravel the mystery.

I thought this book was utterly gripping, with a compelling plot and plenty of twists and turns as more bits of evidence are discovered. It reminded me of the books I’ve read by Gillian Flynn (which are fantastic), although slightly toned down in graphicness for a YA audience.

The teenage school setting was wonderfully toxic, with all the Mean Girls-esque cattiness and plotting, false friends and queen bees aplenty. The suspicion and jealousy of those kind of teenage friendships and relationships was portrayed really well.

I’d highly recommend this to anyone who likes thrillers. It’s really made me want to read more of the crime genre!

Thank you to Netgalley and Gollancz for providing me with a copy of this book!

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ 4/5 stars

xxxooOx

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These Shallow Graves – Jennifer Donnelly

Josephine Montfort is a young woman from one of New York’s most elite families. At the beginning of the book, she discovers that her father has died. Was it an accident? Suicide? Murder? Jo decides to find out.

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This book has had loads of really positive reviews on Goodreads, so I had fairly high expectations going into it. I had been informed it was an utter page turner, with a really immersive setting; a true thriller.

Overall though, I though this book was just a bit meh. I would say it was pretty similar to Philip Pullman’s The Ruby in the Smoke, but not as good. I certainly didn’t feel particularly thrilled. The setting was good, a classic turn-of-the-century New York, with contrasts between the grand upper class houses, and the crime-ridden slums, but for some reason, I just didn’t feel excited about it.

In the first 100 pages I just found myself feeling quite apathetic towards the characters and the plot – they seemed quite wooden and predictable. The whole trope of intelligent woman who has to give up all her ambitions because of her class is an important one, but I just felt like I’d heard it all before.

On top of this, the characters were just SO STUPID. It took them ages to figure out really obvious clues. For example, when they rule out that the death wasn’t an accident or a suicide, they genuinely are stumped as to what else it could be. A lot of the “dramatic twists” in the story were so drawn out that they lost all excitement and impact.

One character I did really like was Fey. I was surprised that she warmed to Jo as much as she did, but she ended up being a real hero, going out of her way to help out with her badass thievery skills. She actually seemed a lot more intelligent than Jo, despite her lack of education, and wise from having had to fend for herself.

Having said that, I did find that the story picked up again towards the end. In the last 100 pages or so, I became more gripped, and actually began to find it a bit more exciting. I certainly didn’t anticipate all the twists that happened. The ending was satisfying – not too clichéd (but probably headed that way).

A slight pet peeve of mine that popped up a couple of times in this is when characters in books scoff at something, saying that only happens in books. For some reason I find it incredibly cringey.

I think perhaps this book was just aimed at younger readers than me. Having read some adult thrillers, such as Gillian Flynn, I simply failed to muster up much excitement for this fairly predictable plot. Perhaps I have become cynical and withered in my old age.

⭐️⭐️⭐️3/5

XxxooXOo