Risuko – David Kudler

Can one girl win a war?

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From the blurb and description, I expected this to be an epic story of a brave young girl managing to play her part in a world of men. Kind of like Mulan (although of course that’s set in China, not Japan). I have a feeling that this may be the case in future instalments of the story, although so far this hasn’t really been evident. The question “Can one girl win a war?” is certainly not that relevant, as she doesn’t even try.

This really did feel like the first book in a series, with a lot of setting up of characters, but not a lot of actual plot. I felt as though I spent a lot of time waiting for things to happen, but not much really did.

The setting of ancient Japan was interesting, and not something I’ve ever read about before. There was a lot of stuff mentioned about the Japanese civil war, although I can’t say I actually understood what was going on. Partly because I couldn’t remember the unfamiliar names (totally my fault though, not the book’s!)

Despite the interesting setting, I just didn’t really ever feel emotionally invested in the book. There were elements of mystery in it, and some parts were quite exciting, but when the climactic “reveal” moment came, I didn’t really get it. Perhaps the author assumed too much background knowledge of the Japanese factions, or perhaps I hadn’t been concentrating hard enough.

Overall I did find this book to have a very interesting premise, and I loved the main character, Risuko. The time period is an interesting one, that I would be keen to learn more about. I think the main problems I had were just that the history wasn’t explained clearly enough, and that the story seemed to be “saving” itself for future books.

Thank you very much to Netgalley and Stillpoint Digital Press for providing this book!

⭐️⭐️⭐️3/5

 

June Book Haul – 2016

Here’s a look at the books that made their way into my possession during the month of June! Most of these ones come from libraries this month, because I bought quite a lot of books in May

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  1. Heffer’s

This is the Cambridge branch of Blackwell’s books, est. 1876. It has a really cool multi-layer layout, with multiple concentric balconies going all the way round. I went their with my friend last week, and picked up…

The Lies We Tell OurselvesRobin Talley22710376.jpg

I definitely heard about this on Booktube, although I can’t remember whose video it was. It’s set in 1959 Virginia, in a school that has just started allowing black students to attend. Both a civil rights and LGBT book, and it’s had fab reviews.

  1. City Library

Went and picked up a couple more books from here. I’m loving using this library, although unlike my college library it charges for fines for late books, so I’d better be careful…

23592235Am I Normal yet? – Holly Bourne

I’ve already read and reviewed this, and absolutely loved it. It follows a teenager with OCD, through her life and relationships, and includes some awesome feminist stuff too.

We were liars – E. Lockhart16143347.jpg

This is an old booktube fave that I’m sure pretty much everyone has read. I’ve heard it’s best to go into it blind, so I don’t really know much about it.

  1. College Library

My college library has mostly academic books, but there’s this wonderful magical room called the light reading section, where you can just borrow as many books as you like. It’s based on trust, so there’s no official deadline/stress for giving them back. I picked up 4 books from here.

884424.jpgThe Almost Moon Alice Sebold

I’ve read 2 books by Alice Sebold in the past, The Lovely Bones, which was absolutely amazing, and Lucky, which was OK. I saw this one, which I hadn’t head of, and thought I’d give it a try, in the hope it lives up to The Lovely Bones. Not really sure what it’s about, but it had something about a girl killing her mother on the back…

Behind the Beautiful Forevers – Katherine Boo11869272.jpg

I heard about this one from one of John Green’s book recommendation videos, where it was recommended for people interested in decreasing “world-suck” (bad things like poverty/suffering/disease/inequality). I believe it is set in a slum in India.

2629628.jpgThe Brief and Wonderous Life of Oscar Wao – Junot Díaz

Again, not completely sure what this is about, other than a person called Oscar Wao, set somewhere in America. Has had great reviews though.

I Was Told There’d Be Cake ­– Sloane Crosley2195289.jpg

Probably the most random choice on this list, this is a set of essays by someone I’d never heard of. I was drawn to it by the interesting title, nice spine, and held onto it for its funny blurb. I hope this will be entertaining. We’ll see.

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So that’s it for the books I’ve got in June! I’ve also started reading some things on NetGalley, one of which I’ve got rather stuck on, but feel the need to soldier on so I can review it… Oh well. I hope you have all had marvellous Junes.

XoxoxxOX

 

Am I Normal Yet? – Holly Bourne

OK, so this book was completely not what I expected it to be.

From the title, cover, tag line (“It’s tough being a girl”), and the checklist on the back (college, parties, friends who don’t dump you, a boyfriend), I had categorised it as a light, girly contemporary. Its description in my Summer TBR was a “hilarious light summer read”. Clearly I hadn’t read the blurb with any kind of accuracy. I think this comes of having had such a strong recommendation from a trusted friend – I knew I definitely wanted to read it, so I hadn’t spend much time researching what it was actually about! 23592235

Anyway, to correct my previous misconceptions, Am I Normal Yet is about a girl called Evie, who suffers from severe OCD and general anxiety disorder. After a long period of recovery, she has returned to college, where she’s faced with all the normal college-y things, and has to deal with them on top of her illness.

The book was written from Evie’s point of view, and it was very eye-opening to get inside her head. Holly Bourne did a lot of research for this book, talking to psychiatrists and people suffering from OCD, and I think she did a great job. The first person narrative combined with the anxiety-ridden inner monologue really got under my skin, and made me better understand what Evie was going through, giving me a real sense of paranoia and lack of control.

Another interesting aspect was Evie’s perspectives on mental illness, from how she thinks people perceive her, to her family’s reactions, how society’s view of them has changed, and the way people use the names of mental illnesses flippantly in conversations.

Despite its heavy subject matter, this book was still actually pretty funny at times. Some of the characters were hilarious (I loved Amber especially).

I thought the discussions on feminism were absolutely fantastic. The three best friends, trying to reclaim the word “spinster” set up the Spinster Club. During meetings they discuss a range of issues, from periods, friendships, dating, and mental illness. They brought up topics such as the “Madonna-whore complex”, and “Manic pixie dream girls”. I’ve never seen this kind of discussion in a YA book before, and I think these are such important ideas for teenagers to learn about.

Another feminism thing I really enjoyed was the Bechdel test, which I’d never heard of before. Basically, a book/film passes the test if it contains one conversation between two women, that isn’t just about men. A surprising number of films don’t pass!

Despite this educational element, this aspect of the  book remains funny and light hearted, and isn’t at all preachy.

Overall, I was very impressed with this book and how much important stuff it managed to fit in. Its discussions of feminism, mental illness, family, friendships, and relationships, in such an entertaining yet informative way, make this book a thoroughly deserving recipient of the YA book prize.

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️4.5/5

XoxooOooOX

These Shallow Graves – Jennifer Donnelly

Josephine Montfort is a young woman from one of New York’s most elite families. At the beginning of the book, she discovers that her father has died. Was it an accident? Suicide? Murder? Jo decides to find out.

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This book has had loads of really positive reviews on Goodreads, so I had fairly high expectations going into it. I had been informed it was an utter page turner, with a really immersive setting; a true thriller.

Overall though, I though this book was just a bit meh. I would say it was pretty similar to Philip Pullman’s The Ruby in the Smoke, but not as good. I certainly didn’t feel particularly thrilled. The setting was good, a classic turn-of-the-century New York, with contrasts between the grand upper class houses, and the crime-ridden slums, but for some reason, I just didn’t feel excited about it.

In the first 100 pages I just found myself feeling quite apathetic towards the characters and the plot – they seemed quite wooden and predictable. The whole trope of intelligent woman who has to give up all her ambitions because of her class is an important one, but I just felt like I’d heard it all before.

On top of this, the characters were just SO STUPID. It took them ages to figure out really obvious clues. For example, when they rule out that the death wasn’t an accident or a suicide, they genuinely are stumped as to what else it could be. A lot of the “dramatic twists” in the story were so drawn out that they lost all excitement and impact.

One character I did really like was Fey. I was surprised that she warmed to Jo as much as she did, but she ended up being a real hero, going out of her way to help out with her badass thievery skills. She actually seemed a lot more intelligent than Jo, despite her lack of education, and wise from having had to fend for herself.

Having said that, I did find that the story picked up again towards the end. In the last 100 pages or so, I became more gripped, and actually began to find it a bit more exciting. I certainly didn’t anticipate all the twists that happened. The ending was satisfying – not too clichéd (but probably headed that way).

A slight pet peeve of mine that popped up a couple of times in this is when characters in books scoff at something, saying that only happens in books. For some reason I find it incredibly cringey.

I think perhaps this book was just aimed at younger readers than me. Having read some adult thrillers, such as Gillian Flynn, I simply failed to muster up much excitement for this fairly predictable plot. Perhaps I have become cynical and withered in my old age.

⭐️⭐️⭐️3/5

XxxooXOo

Cover design: Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone

This book needs no introduction, obviously.

Harry potter

I took this picture in the library of Trinity College Dublin, and I think it’s the most amazing library I’ve ever seen. I love the way there were giant books at the bottom, tiny books at the top, and the ladders for getting to the higher shelves.

Anyway, it reminded me a bit of the Hogwarts library (although that’s actually filmed in Oxford). The library plays quite an important part in the first Harry Potter book, since it’s where they go to try and find out about Nicholas Flamel, and where they eventually find the answer, which is in one of Hermione’s “light reading” books.

I also like the bust, which definitely hints at “philosophers”, even though there probably wasn’t a bust of Nicholas Flamel in the Hogwart’s library! I can’t actually remember who the bust is of in real life though.

XxoOxOxx

Top 10 Tuesday Tag – Summer Reads

I first saw this tag on Books for Thought, which lead me back to the original creator of the tag, The Broke and the Bookish.

I realise I have kind of missed the Tuesday boat, but oh well, these things happen.

The theme for this week is “Top Ten books we plan to put in our beach bag this summer”. I don’t actually think I’ll be going to the beach this summer, but in any case, I am (obviously) not the kind of person who only reads on the beach! So I’ve adapted this to “Top Ten books I plan to read this summer”! 🌸 🌞 🐳

I’m not someone who massively goes for rigid monthly TBR lists – I tend to pick each book as it comes. But nevertheless, here are 10 books I would really like to get to this summer!

  1. Scarlet – Marissa Meyer 13206760.jpg

I read Cinder, the first book, last summer. I quite enjoyed it, although I was on a long distance walking trail at the time, so was quite distracted at the time of reading. However, although the first book didn’t leave a massive impression on me, I’ve heard people I trust absolutely raving about this series, so I’m determined to give it another go!

2. Aristotle and Dante discover the Secrets of the Universe – Benjamin Alire Sáenz12000020.jpg

This one’s been on my TBR list ever since I first started watching Booktube videos. It seems to be on SO many people’s top favourite books lists, but I’ve just never managed to get round to it!

3. The Enchanted – Rene Denfield 18090147.jpg

Another Booktube-originating recommendation (from Regan I believe), this is a magical realism novel set in a prison. I’ve always been slightly fascinated by prisons, in a weird kind of way.

11486.jpg4. The Colour Purple – Alice Walker 

This one’s been on my bookshelf at home since at least last year. It’s about civil rights/ racism in America, and it’s on a lot of lists of “important” books.

5. Room – Emma Donoghue 7937843.jpg

EVERYBODY has been talking about Room. And if the book didn’t already sound amazing enough, the film is also supposed to be incredible.

13477676.jpg6. Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock – Matthew Quick

This is another book that I’ve been meaning to read for ages. I think it’s just the slow trickle of positive comments that have finally won over my curiosity. Also, apparently the formatting is really cool.

7. The Girls – Emma Cline26893819.jpg

This is a really new release, coming out this month I think. It follows the girls involved in a cult in America in the 1960s. I’ve seen it on a few people’s blogs, but it was Candice’s review that really convinced me.

23592235.jpg8. Am I Normal Yet? – Holly Bourne

This one was recommended to me by an IRL friend. Sounds like a hilarious light summer read. Also nominated for the 2016 YA book award (ooh).

9. White Oleander – Janet Fitch32234.jpg

This is a book I picked up in a charity shop at some point last year, and have just never quite got round to reading. One of Stories for Sophie’s posts has pushed this one back to the front of my mind in the past week or so.

16068905.jpg10. Fangirl  Rainbow Rowell

It has taken me along time to admit that I want to read this book. I will basically admit that I found it quite embarrassing to want to read a book called “Fangirl”. I don’t really classify myself as a fangirl, which for me draws to mind images of screechy, hysterical, young teenagers. I pigeon-holed it in my mind along with “Girl Online” and other “internet-y” books. BUT this book has just had TOO MANY positive reviews from people I trust, and I am beginning to think I misclassified it. I simply must find out what all the fuss is about (plus, Eleanor and Park was fantastic).

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So that’s it, the top 10 books I plan to get to this summer!

If you fancy giving this tag a go yourself, then I tag you! The original creators just ask that you make sure to link back to their blog in your post.

XoXOXOoX

Chasing the Stars – Malorie Blackman

Chasing the Stars is Malorie Blackman’s newest novel. It’s described as a YA-Sci-Fi retelling of Othello, mostly set on a space-ship. 🚀

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I don’t want to give too much away in my synopsis, because it’s one of those books that withholds background details and then reveals them later on, but basically, Vee and her brother Aidan are the only two remaining survivors on their spaceship, after a mysterious virus wiped out all the other crew members. Near the beginning of the book, they end up rescuing a group of people from a planet, where they’re under attack from some malicious aliens called Mazon. The rest of the book takes place on the spaceship.

The narrative alternates with first person chapters from the main male and female characters, Vee and Nathan. I’m not too familiar with Othello, but I think Vee is Othello, and Nathan is his lover Desdemona (so the genders are swapped round).

I’m not quite sure how closely the plot of Othello was followed, but there were definitely quite a few of the same plot devices, including the planting of an incriminating object on someone under false pretences, and the classic Shakespearean pre-arranged eavesdropping session. The writing was also peppered with cheeky Shakespearean quotes, although not all from Othello.

The setting on a spaceship was quite cool. I’m not really into that kind of thing usually, so I was a bit sceptical at first, but it seemed to work out. Malorie Blackman is good at writing about computers and robots, perhaps partly due to her her background in computer programming! The gadgets and cool futuristic stuff on the spaceship was fairly stereotypical though – nothing especially original.

I definitely found similarities to the Noughts and Crosses series – the way the characters were so stubborn and held quite unreasonable grudges against each other (although this might partly have been dictated by the plot of Othello). The first person narrative lead to quite a lot of ranting and complaining inside the characters’ heads, as well as harping on about how much they fancied each other. They definitely weren’t especially “likeable” characters.

The book could definitely be accused of insta-love, although since Vee’s been marooned on a spaceship for years, perhaps it’s understandable for her to fall in love with the first other person she sees. There’s definitely self awareness of the insta-love though, with both characters reflecting on it, and whether it was real (a lot) throughout the book.

All in all, an interesting and engaging read. I was certainly drawn along, following the trail of hints at future reveals of background information, despite getting a bit sick of the characters’ inner monologues.

Thank you very much to Penguin for sending me a copy of the book 🐧

⭐️⭐️⭐️3/5

XoXOXOOooo